Memphis Slim – “I Just Landed In Your Town”

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John Len Chatman, better known as Memphis Slim, started his life in (you guessed it) Memphis, Tennessee before emigrating to Paris, France in the 1960's. He made over 500 recordings in his career, for Bluebird, Okeh, Miracle, and other original blues and folk labels, teaming up with Sonny Boy Williamson, Big Bill Broonzy, Willy Dixon and many other blues greats along the way. This early recording of "I Just Landed In Your Town" features an incredible vocal and piano performance by Memphis Slim, ... [Listen and Learn More]

Bogus Ben Covington – “Adam And Eve In The Garden”

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Legend has it that "Bogus" Ben Covington earned his title by pretending to be a blind man on the minstrel circuit. Very little is known about Ben Covington, but it is also suspected he and Ben Curry, who recorded one of the earliest versions of the Dirty Dozens, were one and the same person. Convington was also known as “The Human Pretzel.” With so many monickers, who needs a definitive bio? Bogus Ben Covington's blues reflections on "Adam And Eve In The Garden" were not your average Sunday ... [Listen and Learn More]

Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band – “Highway No. 61″

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Several decades before Bob Dylan recorded his breakthrough "Highway 61 Revisited" album, the folk-blues song "Highway No. 61" was interpreted by numerous blues singers including Charlie Pickett, Memphis Minnie and Joe McCoy, The Sparks Brothers and others. Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band recorded this classic version with fiddler Will Batts on vocal duties. According to Dylan, when he told his record label the title of his new album in 1965, they didn't understand it, and only agreed ... [Listen and Learn More]

King David’s Jug Band – “Sweet Potato Blues”

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King David's Jug Band was a popular attraction in Cincinnati, Ohio's West End in the early 20'th century. Named for guitarist David Crockett, the group also featured Sam "Stovepipe" Jones on, well, just about everything. As a "one-man band" performing in speakeasies during prohibition and on the street, Jones played guitar, harmonica and kazoo (through a stovepipe!) all at once, while sporting a stovepipe hat (of course!). As King David's Jug Band, they recorded six sides for Okeh Records. ... [Listen and Learn More]

Blind Blake – “Hookworm Blues”

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The "King Of Ragtime Guitar," Blind Blake makes his 6-string sing on this swinging uptempo blues rag, "Hookworm Blues," which also features the piano stylings of Alex Robinson. Blake's vocal interlaces with the piano and guitar patterns to complete a whole much greater than the sum of its parts. This track really boogies, and it's another fine example of an early blueprint for rock and roll. Famous for his innovative guitar work, Blind Blake recorded about 80 sides for Paramount Records. ... [Listen and Learn More]

Peg Leg Howell – “Peg Leg Stomp”

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Born on a farm in Eatonton, Georgia in March of 1888, Joshua Barnes Howell taught himself to play guitar at the age of 21. He took the name "Peg Leg" after losing his right leg when he was shot in a fight. Howell then moved to Atlanta to pursue music full-time and in 1926 he was discovered and recorded by Columbia Records. On "Peg Leg Stomp" as on a series of releases through the 1920's, Howell was accompanied by Eddie Anthony on fiddle and Henry Williams on guitar. Decades later, during the ... [Listen and Learn More]

Bessie Smith – “A Good Man is Hard to Find”

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To say Bessie Smith was a superstar in her time is no overstatement. She had no less than fifteen chart-topping hits on Columbia Records, starting with her debut single "Downhearted Blues" which went to number one and sold over 2 million copies, a staggering number back then. "A Good Man Is Hard To Find" is one of Smith's later hits, featuring her majestic vocal performance, expertly accompanied by by Porter Grainger on piano and Lincoln Conoway on guitar. This digital transfer from a 78 RPM ... [Listen and Learn More]

Big Bill Broonzy – “How You Want It Done”

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In his long career, Big Bill Broonzy wrote and copyrighted over 300 songs. Many were original, some were adaptations of folk songs in the oral tradition. You can hear in this early Broonzy recording of "How You Want It Done," the seeds of rock and roll guitar playing which would later sprout in the hands of Chuck Berry, Bill Haley and many others in the 1950's. We're fortunate to have a nice clean digital copy to enjoy today. ... [Listen and Learn More]

The Mississippi Sheiks – “Please Baby”

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The Mississippi Sheiks from Bolton, Mississippi were a popular band in their time, and their recorded songs have been covered by an impressive list of artists that includes Howlin' Wolf, Nat King Cole, Frank Sinatra, Harry Belafonte and Bob Dylan. Three of the Sheiks were brothers Lonnie, Sam, and Armenter Chatmon, the latter of whom is famously known as Bo Carter, who enjoyed a successful solo career while he managed and was a part time member of the band. This recording of "Please Baby" ... [Listen and Learn More]

Ed Meeker – “Take Me Out To The Ball Game”

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Opening day of the baseball season always makes me think of Ed Meeker and his classic song “Take Me Out To The Ball Game”. Edward Meeker served as Thomas Edison's announcer on many of the audio recordings on the Edison label. He also performed Vaudeville skits and created sound effects in those very early days of recorded entertainment. Remember to sing along! “It's 1, 2, 3 strikes you’re out at the old ball game.” Here's a cool video with some historical images including the original ... [Listen and Learn More]

Tommie Bradley and James Cole – “Where You Been So Long?”

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Guitarist Tommie Bradley and fiddler James Cole recorded "Where You Been So Long?" in Richmond, Indiana. Their music, a unique blend of blues, vaudeville, hillbilly fiddling, and Tin Pan Alley style jazz, provides the perfect backdrop to their sparkling vocal harmonies. There's so much energy in this track, it puts you right in the room with them nearly a century ago. Another priceless gem from the wayback machine. Enjoy and share. ... [Listen and Learn More]

Mississippi John Hurt – “Avalon Blues”

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"Avalon Blues" was the last song recorded by Mississippi John Hurt in the 1920's. Named for Hurt's hometown of Avalon, Mississippi, this song provided clues that folk musicologist Tom Hoskins used to locate the legendary bluesman in the early 1960's. That meeting led to Hurt's appearance at the 1963 Newport Folk Festival, which re-launched his career and gained him international recognition. After that, Mississippi John Hurt performed extensively, even recording three new albums and appearing on ... [Listen and Learn More]

Big Joe Williams – “Stack O’ Dollars”

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Mississippi blues legend Big Joe Williams testifies on the real value of a Stack O' Dollars, on this astonishing early Delta blues recording. Williams' unique 9-string steel guitar rhythm, alongside a haunting fiddle lead, provides the perfect accompaniment to his searing vocal. Joe Williams continued to tour and perform for decades after recording this and numerous other sides for various early record labels. This song is as relevant today as it has ever been. ... [Listen and Learn More]