Dixieland Jug Blowers – “Boodle-Am Shake”

Dixieland_Jug_BlowersThe Dixieland Jug Blowers fused the traditional Jug Band lineup of jug, banjo, guitar and fiddle, with jazz woodwinds, brass and piano. In fact the band was a combo of two separate groups run by jug player Earl McDonald and fiddler Clifford Hayes. Their musical innovations, immortalized on Victor Records, influenced other groups including the Memphis Jug Band. The “oompa oompa” tuba and carefree melodic interplay on “Boodle-Am Shake” set up a cartoonish vocal refrain perfectly, on this classic and joyous recording.

Tommie Bradley and James Cole – “Where You Been So Long?”

Guitarist Tommie Bradley and fiddler James Cole recorded “Where You Been So Long?” in Richmond, Indiana. Their music, a unique blend of blues, vaudeville, hillbilly fiddling, and Tin Pan Alley style jazz, provides the perfect backdrop to their sparkling vocal harmonies. There’s so much energy in this track, it puts you right in the room with them nearly a century ago. Another priceless gem from the wayback machine. Enjoy and share.

The Charleston 7 – “Toodles”

This great performance of the instrumental Roaring 20’s romp, “Toodles,” by Edison Recording Artist, the Charleston 7, stands the test of time on this MP3 from the original Edison Disc. You may recognize a theme or two from this piece, which were later borrowed by the Looney Tunes gang for Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck cartoons! Step into the Wayback Machine in your finest flapper apparel, and dance the Charleston to this high energy combo!



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Mamie Smith & Her Jazz Hounds – “Crazy Blues”

How crazy is crazy blues? Well, has you ever been in love? If you has, then you knows! If you hasn’t, then you don’t. This song is but a preview for the uninitiated, and a calming opiate for those in the know. Oh, that trombone makes our knees buckle. This song was huge hit in its day, and ain’t no reason you shouldn’t have it in your iPod or whatever gizmo you kids are runnin’ with. Clean mp3 copy on this one, too.

Annette Hanshaw – “Ain’t He Sweet”

Annette Hanshaw’s sincere and unaffected vocal style was a natural fit for the jazz-influenced pop music which emerged in the 1920’s. Her recordings for the Pathé and Perfect Record labels, including an early version of “Body And Soul,” were hits in the Golden Age of Radio. Hanshaw left the spotlight in 1936, to settle down with her husband, Pathé executive Herman Rose. “Ain’t He Sweet” finds Annette Hanshaw’s charming and disarming voice accompanied by a single upright piano, in an up-tempo jaunt with echoes of ragtime and speakeasies.

Annette Hanshaw – “Body And Soul”

AnnetteHanshawAnnette Hanshaw’s relaxed, jazz-influenced pop singing style was a hit with the Flappers in the 1920s. Known as “The Personality Girl,” Hanshaw had a prolific career, recording for Columbia, OKeh, and a handful of other labels through the late 1930s. Her early take on “Body and Soul” is a classic, which helped establish the song. Composed by Edward Heyman, Robert Sour and Frank Eyton with music by Johnny Green, this piece been interpreted by literally hundreds of artists, including Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Billy Eckstine, Etta James, Sarah Vaughan and Frank Sinatra.

Georgia Melodians – “Everybody’s Charleston Crazy”

The Georgia Melodians were an early jazz band from Savannah Georgia that performed extensively on the east coast of the US and recorded for Edison Records in the 1920s. Here is their lively celebration of the dance craze The Charleston, released in 1926. Named after the city of Charleston, South Carolina, the dance became a world-wide sensation which peaked around 1927. Pictured is the great Josephine Baker, doing her famous version of the dance. This mp3 is from the original Edison Disc.



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Paul Whiteman Orchestra – “Doo Wacka Doo”

The Paul Whiteman Orchestra famously pushed the boundaries of jazz by incorporating classical orchestration into big band arrangements. Whiteman commissioned and debuted George Gershwin’s groundbreaking “Rhapsody In Blue” in 1924, and his symphonic jazz style influenced many greats who followed – including Miles Davis, Gil Evans and later Winton Marsalis. Here’s an early recording by Paul Whiteman Orchestra – the classic horn player anthem, “Doo Wacka Doo.”




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Louis Armstrong & His All-Stars – “Struttin’ With Some Barbecue”

Louis Armstrong & His All-Stars recorded “Struttin’ With Some Barbecue” in Chicago, Illinois on December 9, 1927. The moment was captured in a crisp recording that is as impressive as it is pure fun. Armstrong’s inspired composition and tight arrangement are brought to life by one of the hottest big bands of all time. Ripped to mp3 from a well preserved 78 RPM vinyl side, this ebullient instrumental classic is free to enjoy and share, hosted by the good folks at archive.org.

Alberta Hunter – “Nobody Knows The Way I Feel This Morning”

Here’s legendary American singer Alberta Hunter’s vintage recording of “Nobody Knows The Way I Feel This Morning.” Originally penned by Tom and Pearl Delaney, this classic was later a hit for Dinah Washington and Aretha Franklin. Alberta Hunter and her small, smart combo, put this song on the musical map forever in 1921, with this unforgettable take.