The Charleston 7 – “Toodles”

This great performance of the instrumental Roaring 20’s romp, “Toodles,” by Edison Recording Artist, the Charleston 7, stands the test of time on this MP3 from the original Edison Disc. You may recognize a theme or two from this piece, which were later borrowed by the Looney Tunes gang for Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck cartoons! Step into the Wayback Machine in your finest flapper apparel, and dance the Charleston to this high energy combo!



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Alonzo Yancey – “Everybody’s Rag”

Ragtime is known as “the music that got lost” – mostly because jazz stole its thunder and captured the public’s attention after 1917. Ragtime showcases brilliant pianists like Alonzo Yancey, the lesser known of the Yancey brothers. Alonzo, raised in Chicago, recorded “Everybody’s Rag” in 1943. He serves his piano straight up, and one can only imagine what it’s like to move your fingers as fast as this melody requires. A compelling and ferocious performance.

Georgia Melodians – “Everybody’s Charleston Crazy”

The Georgia Melodians were an early jazz band from Savannah Georgia that performed extensively on the east coast of the US and recorded for Edison Records in the 1920s. Here is their lively celebration of the dance craze The Charleston, released in 1926. Named after the city of Charleston, South Carolina, the dance became a world-wide sensation which peaked around 1927. Pictured is the great Josephine Baker, doing her famous version of the dance. This mp3 is from the original Edison Disc.



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Fiddlin Frank Nelson – “Buck Creek Gal”

Fiddlin Frank Nelson was a moniker used by the great southern fiddler, Doc Roberts. Doc was a farmer first and a musician in his spare time. Although he only played and recorded on weekends, he cut over 70 sides! “Buck Creek Gal” is an upbeat number, and you can hear how his style influenced early country music. Unpretentious and infectious, this is some pure old time instrumental hillbilly music fun.

Louis Armstrong & His All-Stars – “Struttin’ With Some Barbecue”

Louis Armstrong & His All-Stars recorded “Struttin’ With Some Barbecue” in Chicago, Illinois on December 9, 1927. The moment was captured in a crisp recording that is as impressive as it is pure fun. Armstrong’s inspired composition and tight arrangement are brought to life by one of the hottest big bands of all time. Ripped to mp3 from a well preserved 78 RPM vinyl side, this ebullient instrumental classic is free to enjoy and share, hosted by the good folks at archive.org.

London Philharmonic Orchestra – “Beethoven’s Concerto No. 5, in E-flat Major”

Here is a stellar performance of Beethoven’s Concerto No. 5, in E-flat Major, Op. 73 (“Emperor”), by the London Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by George Szell, featuring Benno Moiseivitch on piano. The audio quality is superb, especially when you consider this was recorded in 1938 and only much later transferred to a digital medium. Here are all three movements, in two high resolution mp3s. Magnificent.

I. Allegro

II. Adagio, III. Rondo

Duke Ellington – “Washington Wobble”

There is some debate as to the origin of this Duke Ellington title. “Washington Wobble” might pay tribute to the earthquake-prone Evergreen State; Others claim it refers to Elmer Fudd, describing our elected or appointed officials and their well-heeled lobbyists in Ellington’s birthplace of Washington, DC! Either way, it cooks from start to finish with some great up-tempo section work and lively solo playing, and today is a fine day to post some classic American music.

Duke Ellington – “Jubilee Stomp”

This up-beat instrumental by Duke Ellington was recorded in 1928. “Jubilee Stomp” cooks from beginning to end, carrying with it all the energy and rhythm of urban America in the Roaring ’20s. This well mastered mp3 delivers the warmth and sparkle of the original 78 RPM release.

Louis Armstrong – “Old Man Mose”

Louis_Armstrong250A brilliant recording from the great Louis Armstrong, “Old Man Mose” has a swingin’ beat that will have your feet tappin’ and your hands clappin’. Enjoy this beautifully remastered cut that’s sure to delight a whole new generation of jazz fans. So cool, so hot.