New, Old Music by Dick Justice


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This song is still significant some 75 plus years later.

Originally written and recorded by Luke Jordan in 1927, Justice re-made his own version of the song blending a little folk with some blues and speeding up the tempo.

We enhanced the sound @ East Bay Recording with Michael Rosen on the board and Eric Din played keyboard and guitar along with Dick Justice.

Check it out:

Here’s a link to the original recording.

Download

Clayton McMichen – “Grave In The Pines”

ClaytonMcMichenPDBorn in January of 1900 in Allatoona, Georgia, Clayton McMichen had his great success recording with Gid Tanner and the Skillet Lickers and Hometown Boys, and also as a solo artist. His solo effort performance of “Grave In The Pines” is a starkly sweet and sincere lament to a fallen love. McMichen performed regularly in Louisville, Kentucky until retiring in 1955, and later returning to the stage at the Newport Folk Festival in 1964.

Peg Leg Howell – “Peg Leg Stomp”

Born on a farm in Eatonton, Georgia in March of 1888, Joshua Barnes Howell taught himself to play guitar at the age of 21. He took the name “Peg Leg” after losing his right leg when he was shot in a fight. Howell then moved to Atlanta to pursue music full-time and in 1926 he was discovered and recorded by Columbia Records. On “Peg Leg Stomp” as on a series of releases through the 1920’s, Howell was accompanied by Eddie Anthony on fiddle and Henry Williams on guitar. Decades later, during the 1960’s blues revival, Peg Leg Howell was rediscovered by George Mitchell, who recorded him again.

Big Bill Broonzy – “How You Want It Done”

Big-Bill-BroonzyIn his long career, Big Bill Broonzy wrote and copyrighted over 300 songs. Many were original, some were adaptations of folk songs in the oral tradition. You can hear in this early Broonzy recording of “How You Want It Done,” the seeds of rock and roll guitar playing which would later sprout in the hands of Chuck Berry, Bill Haley and many others in the 1950’s. We’re fortunate to have a nice clean digital copy to enjoy today.

Akins Birmingham Boys – “I Walked And Walked”

AkinsBoysWalkedThis is one fine early example of amply motivated walking in song, from a group called Akins Birmingham Boys. Little biographical info is available online about these ukelele strummin’ and fiddlin’ singers, but we do know they recorded this and one other side for Columbia records, and the songs more than stand the test of time. Great vocals on this early pop country gem.

The Mississippi Sheiks – “Please Baby”

Mississippi_ShieksThe Mississippi Sheiks from Bolton, Mississippi were a popular band in their time, and their recorded songs have been covered by an impressive list of artists that includes Howlin’ Wolf, Nat King Cole, Frank Sinatra, Harry Belafonte and Bob Dylan. Three of the Sheiks were brothers Lonnie, Sam, and Armenter Chatmon, the latter of whom is famously known as Bo Carter, who enjoyed a successful solo career while he managed and was a part time member of the band. This recording of “Please Baby” captures their distinct blend of country, folk, and blues.

Ephraim Woodie & The Henpecked Husbands – “Last Gold Dollar”

EphraimWoodieTheHenpeckedHusbands-LastGoldDollar“Last Gold Dollar” is the first of several sides Ephraim Woodie and the Henpecked Husbands recorded for the Columbia label in 1929. Led by Ephraim Woodie’s affecting vocal, this North Carolina group featured Clay Reed on fiddle and multi-instrumentalist Edison Nuckolls on banjo. Original pressings of their records are rare and highly sought-after by collectors, and we are lucky to have this nice clean digital copy to share and enjoy. This song is about as sincere and uncomplicated as any love song ever could be.

Tommie Bradley and James Cole – “Where You Been So Long?”

Guitarist Tommie Bradley and fiddler James Cole recorded “Where You Been So Long?” in Richmond, Indiana. Their music, a unique blend of blues, vaudeville, hillbilly fiddling, and Tin Pan Alley style jazz, provides the perfect backdrop to their sparkling vocal harmonies. There’s so much energy in this track, it puts you right in the room with them nearly a century ago. Another priceless gem from the wayback machine. Enjoy and share.

The Dixon Brothers – “Intoxicated Rat”

South Carolina brothers Dorsey and Howard Dixon worked for many years in Carolina textile mills, and some of their original compositions were sung by striking mill workers during labor disputes in the early 1930’s. This earned them the nickname “hillbilly communists” among the local authorities. RCA Victor Records saw fit to record the rabble-rousing duo, and they released over fifty sides in their time. “Intoxicated Rat” features The Dixon Brothers’ easy vocal harmonies and trademark slide guitar style.

Taylor’s Kentucky Boys – “Forked Deer”

Country blues fiddle pioneer Jim Booker recorded with Taylor’s Kentucky Boys, as well as his own Booker Orchestra. This track called “Forked Deer” showcases his nimble finger technique and energetic, highly melodic musical style. This was definitely dance music at the time of its creation, so don’t be surprised if you find yourself tapping your feet or doing a spontaneous hoe-down! Pure instrumental early bluegrass fun.