New, Old Music From Paul Whiteman

A real music pioneer, Paul Whiteman added orchestral instrumentation to the jazz of the day and recorded “Do Wacka Do” over 90 years ago. We mastered the original for streaming, and cleaned up this masterpiece of fun and joy. I can picture a truly great cartoon of the singer and band in my mind just listening to this song.

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Here’s a link to the original recording

Bill Cox – “Midnight Special”

Covered by many, yet understood by few, “Midnight Special” was traditionally a folk song which originated among prisoners. The country-blues version, sung by Bill Cox, hums along like a freight train, encouraging the light of the powerful locomotive to inspire those out of their destitution.

Click here to listen or download for free at archive.org.

New, Old Music by Lydia Mendoza

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This is exactly why I love this site so much. I would have never heard Lydia sing, so clearly. Again thanks to Michael Rosen @ Easy Bay Recorders, he made us a clean digital file. What a great vocal! What fine 12 string guitar playing! What a dark song! Check out the translated lyrics.

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Here’s a link to the original recording.

New, Old Music by Blind Blake

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This early classic of ragtime blues guitar continues to inspire musicians and entertain music lovers to today.

We enhanced the sound @ East Bay Recording with Michael Rosen on the board and Eric Din playing guitar along with Blind Blake.

Check it out:


Here’s a link to the original recording.

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New, Old Music by Dick Justice


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This song is still significant some 75 plus years later.

Originally written and recorded by Luke Jordan in 1927, Justice re-made his own version of the song blending a little folk with some blues and speeding up the tempo.

We enhanced the sound @ East Bay Recording with Michael Rosen on the board and Eric Din played keyboard and guitar along with Dick Justice.

Check it out:

Here’s a link to the original recording.

Download

Kid Bailey – “Rowdy Blues”

Mastered-for-Streaming290rowdyEnigmatic blues legend Kid Bailey (AKA Willie Brown) left behind scant few recordings, and clean copies are difficult or perhaps impossible to come by. We downloaded the best audio we could find of Bailey’s classic “Rowdy Blues” from Archive.org, and asked producer Michael Rosen to employ his studio magic to reconstruct the audio with glitches and pops reduced and the warmth of the original recording brought to the fore. It’s a great live take from nearly a century ago, and we are happy to be able to share it for new audiences to enjoy today.

“You Are My Sunshine” as performed by Wilf Carter

you-are-my-sunshine-200“You Are My Sunshine” is an example of country music’s large contribution to American music. This version shows off the song’s country roots. The tune was made popular by Jimmie Davis, who would later became governor of Lousiana. The song was written by a Paul Rice, but the songwriting was credited to the Jimmie Davis and Charles Mitchell, who purchased the song from Mr. Rice.

Wilf Carter, who performs this version, was a Canadian who often used the nickname of “Montana Slim.” Carter’s version evokes the deep melancholy in the song. The contrast between the cheery chorus (the most recognizable section), and the tone of the verses, make this version unique.

One curious part of this recording, the fluttery instrument that emerges during the first chorus, sounds like a direct reference point for a similar texture The Clash would employ on “Somebody Got Murdered,” several decades later.

Clayton McMichen – “Grave In The Pines”

ClaytonMcMichenPDBorn in January of 1900 in Allatoona, Georgia, Clayton McMichen had his great success recording with Gid Tanner and the Skillet Lickers and Hometown Boys, and also as a solo artist. His solo effort performance of “Grave In The Pines” is a starkly sweet and sincere lament to a fallen love. McMichen performed regularly in Louisville, Kentucky until retiring in 1955, and later returning to the stage at the Newport Folk Festival in 1964.

Paul Whiteman with Mildred Bailey – “All Of Me”

Mildred_Bailey_300x230In the American songbook, there are Standards and there are Standards. This would be a front cover of Standard Magazine. “All of Me” by Gerald Marks and Seymour Simons was first recorded by singer Ruth Etting.

This was later recorded and performed by many others including Bing Crosby, Billie Holiday, Louis Armstrong, Benny Goodman, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan and even Frank Sinatra. Mildred Bailey’s lilting vocal helped put this great song on the map, with this early recording by Paul Whiteman’s orchestra.

Bill Brown and His Brownies – “Hot Lips”

brownies-hot-lipsHot Lips, baby! Bill Brown and his Brownies really put something together on this side, recorded for the Brunswick label in 1927. This full combo performance featuring brass, reeds, banjo, tuba, piano, washboard and percussion is as air-tight as it is humorous and fun. Note, the record label states plainly: “For Dancing.” They weren’t kidding! This is so hot, you’re gonna need some lip balm.

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