Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band – “Highway No. 61”

Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band - Highway No. 61Several decades before Bob Dylan recorded his breakthrough “Highway 61 Revisited” album, the folk-blues song “Highway No. 61” was interpreted by numerous blues singers including Charlie Pickett, Memphis Minnie and Joe McCoy, The Sparks Brothers and others. Jack Kelly & His South Memphis Jug Band recorded this classic version with fiddler Will Batts on vocal duties. According to Dylan, when he told his record label the title of his new album in 1965, they didn’t understand it, and only agreed to let him call the record what he wanted after to he went all the way “up the fucking ladder” to insist on it. The rest is history.

Clifford Hayes’ Louisville Stompers – “Dance Hall Shuffle”

Clifford Hayes Earl Macdonald Jug MusicAnother important figure in early Jug Music, Clifford Hayes was born in 1895 in Glasgow, Kentucky. Hayes played fiddle with the Earl McDonald Jug Band in nearby Louisville, the birthplace of Jug music. He later started his own band, and recorded with Sarah Martin and other notables. Jug music was a huge social and musical phenomenon in the late 19th and early 20th century, which happened to coincide with the dawn of recorded music. We are fortunate to have these clear audio glimpses into the past, and “Dance Hall Shuffle” more than lives up to its name. Such a great ensemble performance of piano, guitar, banjo, washboard, fiddle and the kitchen sink.

King David’s Jug Band – “Sweet Potato Blues”

Prohibition, Blues, Jug MusicKing David’s Jug Band was a popular attraction in Cincinnati, Ohio’s West End in the early 20’th century. Named for guitarist David Crockett, the group also featured Sam “Stovepipe” Jones on, well, just about everything. As a “one-man band” performing in speakeasies during prohibition and on the street, Jones played guitar, harmonica and kazoo (through a stovepipe!) all at once, while sporting a stovepipe hat (of course!). As King David’s Jug Band, they recorded six sides for Okeh Records. “Sweet Potato Blues,” provides a glimpse of this eccentric and very talented act.

Dixieland Jug Blowers – “Boodle-Am Shake”

Dixieland_Jug_BlowersThe Dixieland Jug Blowers fused the traditional Jug Band lineup of jug, banjo, guitar and fiddle, with jazz woodwinds, brass and piano. In fact the band was a combo of two separate groups run by jug player Earl McDonald and fiddler Clifford Hayes. Their musical innovations, immortalized on Victor Records, influenced other groups including the Memphis Jug Band. The “oompa oompa” tuba and carefree melodic interplay on “Boodle-Am Shake” set up a cartoonish vocal refrain perfectly, on this classic and joyous recording.

Will Shade – “Better Leave That Stuff Alone”

Jug music pioneer and Memphis blues great Will Shade created most of his over 100 recorded sides as leader of the Memphis Jug Band. But he also created a few solo tracks along the way, including this piano blues gem called “Better Leave That Stuff Alone.” A classic 78 RPM record with a timeless message.