Bill Brown and His Brownies – “Hot Lips”


Hot Lips, baby! Bill Brown and his Brownies really put something together on this side, recorded for the Brunswick label in 1927. This full combo performance featuring brass, reeds, banjo, tuba, piano, washboard and percussion is as air-tight as it is humorous and fun. Note, the record label states plainly: "For Dancing." They weren't kidding! This is so hot, you're gonna need some lip balm. ... [Listen and Learn More]

Tiny Parham And His Musicians – “Washboard Wiggles”


Born in Canada in 1900, keyboardist and composer Hartzel "Tiny" Parham grew up mostly in Kansas City. As a young man, Parham relocated to Chicago where he established himself as a bandleader and also worked as an arranger and talent scout for Paramount Records. He cut numerous sides for Victor Records, under the name Tiny Parham and His Musicians. Here is one of those classic sides, the ebullient and musically very advanced "Washboard Wiggles." You had to be on your toes to keep up with this ... [Listen and Learn More]

Syd Valentine’s Patent Leather Kids – “Rock And Gravel”

Syd Valentine's Patent Leather Kids

This uptempo instrumental romp from Syd Valentine's Patent Leather Kids features some expert piano, banjo, and trumpet work. The players perform solo and together in a tightly arrangement they called "Rock And Gravel." Hailing from Indianpolis, Indiana, the group's main personnel were Syd Valentine, James Helm and Paul George. When the trio played live however, they often had as many as ten pieces in their orchestra. They recorded six songs accompanying Blues singer Hattie Snow, and a few more ... [Listen and Learn More]

Clifford Hayes’ Louisville Stompers – “Dance Hall Shuffle”


Another important figure in early Jug Music, Clifford Hayes was born in 1895 in Glasgow, Kentucky. Hayes played fiddle with the Earl McDonald Jug Band in nearby Louisville, the birthplace of Jug music. He later started his own band, and recorded with Sarah Martin and other notables. Jug music was a huge social and musical phenomenon in the late 19th and early 20th century, which happened to coincide with the dawn of recorded music. We are fortunate to have these clear audio glimpses into the ... [Listen and Learn More]

Harvey Brooks Quality Four – “Frankie And Johnny”


Named after the Quality Cafe in Los Angeles, Harvey Brooks Quality Four was one of several bands formed by pianist Harvey Brooks with clarinet and sax man, Paul Howard. Here is their instrumental version of the classic American murder ballad, "Frankie and Johnny." This song has been recorded and released both vocally and instrumentally a whopping 256 times at least, by a who's-who of music greats from America and around the world. This was one of the first. ... [Listen and Learn More]

Bobby Leecan’s Need More Band – “Washboard Cut Out”


Born in Philadelphia in 1897, Bobby Leecan was an influential steel string guitarist whose style embraced blues, vaudeville, jug music and Dixieland jazz. Leecan recorded numerous sides for Victor and other early record labels, often with his collaborator, harmonica virtuoso Robert Cooksey. The uptempo instrumental "Washboard Cut Out" features washboard, guitar, banjo, cello, fiddle and harmonica, all as lead and rhythm instruments in a tightly arranged romp. It's an impressive feat of combo ... [Listen and Learn More]

Paddy Killoran – “Sligo Maid’s Lament”


Sligo is a form of lively folk music which takes its name from the county and town of Sligo on the west coast of Ireland. Paddy Killoran, one of the biggest names in Sligo, was born there in 1904. He emigrated to the United States in the 1920's and embarked upon a prolific recording and performing career. "Sligo Maid's Lament" was one of his popular 78 RPM sides. Sligo music is alive and well today, and if you like it as much as we do, have a look at for more info on the history of ... [Listen and Learn More]

The Blue Boys (Hayes and Prater) – “Easy Winner”


Guitarist Napoleon "Nap" Hayes and mandolinist Matthew Prater recorded this instrumental gem in Memphis, Tennessee in February of 1928. "Easy Winner" combined elements of ragtime and blues into a string band format, borrowing freely from Scott Joplin's most famous piece, "The Entertainer." Though biographical information about Hayes and Prater is scarce, we do know they performed as the Blue Boys and also as the Johnson Boys, leaving behind a handful of brilliant instrumental recordings on the ... [Listen and Learn More]

Dutch Coleman and Red Whitehead – “Dad’s Gettin’ Fuzzy”


Here's some blistering harmonica boogie from "blues harp" masters Dutch Coleman and Red Whitehead. Expertly shaping the tone with their breath and their mouths, this duo of innovators created a trance-inducing sound way back when, and lucky us, they recorded it. Pure instrumental music goodness with two guys jamming full-on and stompin' they feet. ... [Listen and Learn More]

Taylor’s Kentucky Boys – “Forked Deer”


Country blues fiddle pioneer Jim Booker recorded with Taylor's Kentucky Boys, as well as his own Booker Orchestra. This track called "Forked Deer" showcases his nimble finger technique and energetic, highly melodic musical style. This was definitely dance music at the time of its creation, so don't be surprised if you find yourself tapping your feet or doing a spontaneous hoe-down! Pure instrumental early bluegrass fun. ... [Listen and Learn More]

The Charleston 7 – “Toodles”


This great performance of the instrumental Roaring 20's romp, "Toodles," by Edison Recording Artist, the Charleston 7, stands the test of time on this MP3 from the original Edison Disc. You may recognize a theme or two from this piece, which were later borrowed by the Looney Tunes gang for Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck cartoons! Step into the Wayback Machine in your finest flapper apparel, and dance the Charleston to this high energy combo! ... [Listen and Learn More]

Alonzo Yancey – “Everybody’s Rag”


Ragtime is known as "the music that got lost" - mostly because jazz stole its thunder and captured the public's attention after 1917. Ragtime showcases brilliant pianists like Alonzo Yancey, the lesser known of the Yancey brothers. Alonzo, raised in Chicago, recorded "Everybody's Rag" in 1943. He serves his piano straight up, and one can only imagine what it's like to move your fingers as fast as this melody requires. A compelling and ferocious performance. ... [Listen and Learn More]